This Folio Life: 10 recommended non-fiction reads for the interesting times we are living in

At the moment, we are all trying to navigate our way around a strange, new world, looking for guidance and inspiration as we do so. Can historians, scientists, philosophers and memoirists, past and present, offer us some help and reassurance? Mandy Kirkby, Folio’s Non-Fiction Publisher, certainly thinks so, and lists her favourite non-fiction books to turn to for the situation we now find ourselves in.

 

The Diversity of Life by Edward O. Wilson

The environment worldwide benefited from lockdown, and nature came into its own. Edward O. Wilson’s important and classic book will remind you why we mustn’t forget what a difference it made when we stopped damaging the planet.

Diversity of Life, The Folio Society 2019

 

Selected Poems of William Wordsworth

If you want to hold on to your newfound appreciation of the the natural world for just a while longer, then Wordsworth is your man.

Selected Poems of William Wordsworth, The Folio Society 2020

 

Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do  by Studs Terkel

The pandemic has reshaped our understanding of work and has shown us all too clearly why we should appreciate the supermarket cashier and delivery driver. Learn what American cashiers and drivers felt about their work in the 1970s in Terkel’s timeless and fascinating chronicle. Plus ça change…

Working by Studs Terkel, The Folio Society 2019 

 

The Greatest Benefit To Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity from Antiquity to the Present by Roy Porter

We are all aware of the debt we owe – and will continue to owe – to the medical profession. It’s a centuries’ old story of sacrifice and dedication, and Porter tells it magnificently.

The Greatest Benefit to Mankind by Roy Porter, The Folio Society

 

The Gastronomical Me by M. F. K. Fisher

If you’re still dreaming of a foreign holiday and its highlight – the visit to a luscious and enticing food market – then Mary Fisher’s sparkling account of her lifelong love affair with the food of France should sustain you until the dream finally becomes a reality.

The Gastronomical Me by M. F. K. Fisher, The Folio Society

 

The Mask of Command by John Keegan

What makes a great leader in a crisis and in its aftermath? John Keegan’s masterly study of four military commanders provides illuminating insights into the nature of leadership.

The Mask of Command, The Folio Society

 

South Polar Times

Another time, another place, far far away. This complete collection of the magazines of Captain Scott’s Discovery and Terra Nova Antarctic expeditions, written and illustrated by the crew, including Shackleton, is utterly transporting.

South Polar Times, The Folio Society

 

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

Lessons to be learnt. Anne Frank spent more than two years hidden in an Amsterdam attic during the German occupation. ‘I don’t think about all the misery but about the beauty that remains.’

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank, The Folio Society 

 

Essays by Michel de Montaigne

How would the great thinker and essayist have coped with the pandemic? He’d weathered many outbreaks of the plague in 16th-century France and would have offered us advice on ‘how to live when life itself comes under attack’. And on the easing of lockdown, he’d be sorry it was all over: ‘The wise person will flee the crowd, endure it if necessary, but given the choice, choose solitude.’

Essays by Michel Montaigne, The Folio Society

 

Guns, Germs and Steel: A Short History of Everybody for the Last 13,000 Years by Jared Diamond

Take a step back and put it all in perspective.

Guns, Germs and Steel by Jared Diamond, The Folio Society

 

Is there a non-fiction book that you would recommend?

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  • robert fletcher says:

    “Company Aytch” by Sam Watkins. Watkins was a private in the First Tennessee Infantry (CSA) and wrote what may be the best first person narrative, certainly of the Civil War. Margaret Mitchell claimed it was the best book ever written about the conflict. Thoroughly entertaining and interesting.

  • Rik Zak says:

    Sorry, you are off the mark. Where is 1984? Rubicon
    The Triumph and Tragedy of the Roman Republic? Revelations of Divine Love
    Julian of Norwich? Wilfred Owen: Selected Poems
    Wilfred Owen? Brave New World
    Aldous Huxley? I Am Legend
    Richard Matheson? Fahrenheit 451
    Ray Bradbury? Lord of the Flies
    William Golding? The Man in the High Castle
    Philip K. Dick? Dracula
    Bram Stoker? They should all be on this list.

    • melaniec says:

      There are some wonderful suggestions there Rik! This list is focusing on non-fiction specifically, but those are all fantastic reads.

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